Without measurement there can be no improvement.

Survival from Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) may be improved when best practices are implemented.

Knowing where, and how, to begin isn’t always clear.

Our tools and services help communities prioritize Chain of Survival improvement efforts.

Cardiac Arrest System Assessment

Measure to Improve

Survival from Sudden Cardiac Arrest is unacceptable low – averaging less than 10%. Based on existing science and practices, communities may increase survival by 50%.

The Resuscitation Academy Cardiac Arrest System Assessment Program consists of tools and services to help identify focus areas for communities to mature their Chain of Survival.

Self Assessment

Gain insights with our free Self-Assessment. Includes prioritized recommendations.

Consultative Services Program

Gain further insights through our Consultative Services program.

Coming soon in 2019

The RA has been working with Laerdal and the American Heart Association to develop a new, groundbreaking Consultative Services program.

Through this program, your EMS agency will pair up with expert consultants who will help you take a comprehensive look at your agency’s performance within the Chain of Survival.

Our consultants include telecommunicators, Medical Directors, QI Managers, paramedics, and others. They are experts who have paved the way in HP-CPR, helped the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) set its guidelines for T-CPR practices, worked with EMS agencies around the world, and have led their own EMS agencies toward excellence in saving lives.

Our experts will interview your team and do an in-depth analysis of your agency to identify what concrete steps you can take to save more lives from cardiac arrest.

We will examine six different domains within your agency:

1. High Performance CPR (HP-CPR)
2. Telephone CPR (T-CPR)
3. Rapid Dispatch
4. Cardiac Arrest Registry
5. First Responder CPR/AED
6. Community CPR/Public Access Defibrillation (PAD)

If you would like to learn more and be kept in the loop as this program is released, please click here to sign up to receive email updates.

In EMS, we are all responsible for the lives of those we care for. With this program, you can find out exactly how to better care for those in your community.

Cardiac Arrest System Assessment

A Self Assessment. 30 Questions. Valuable Insights.

For most U.S. communities, survival rates for VF witnessed cardiac arrests are dismal — averaging less than 10%. So how can EMS professionals transform the way we manage cardiac arrests and move the needle on survival rates?

Start with this 30-question assessment to evaluate five key elements spanning the chain of survival:

Areas of Focus

For most U.S. communities, survival rates for VF witnessed cardiac arrests are dismal — averaging less than 10%. So how can EMS professionals transform the way we manage cardiac arrests and move the needle on survival rates?Start with this 30-question assessment to evaluate five key elements spanning the chain of survival:

  • Cardiac Arrest Registry
  • Telephone CPR
  • Rapid dispatch
  • High-performance CPR
  • Strategies to increase early CPR and AED

Assessment results provide insights into the effectiveness of your community’s current approach, and offer recommendations for improvement. Additionally, they foster much-needed conversation between your agency, elected officials, community leaders, and healthcare professionals to develop a concrete plan of action to improve survival.

How to Take the Cardiac Arrest System Assessment

For most U.S. communities, survival rates for VF witnessed cardiac arrests are dismal — averaging less than 10%. So how can EMS professionals transform the way we manage cardiac arrests and move the needle on survival rates?Start with this 30-question assessment to evaluate five key elements spanning the chain of survival:
Your role in the community may determine how you choose to conduct this assessment. Use the following as a guide, but feel free to take whatever approach will drive the most accurate results based on your organization’s needs.

Individual assessment

No single individual can implement improvements to cardiac arrest protocols in a community. However, you can use the results of this assessment as a data-driven conversation starter to open the door to discussion and coordination of resources to help drive real change. Suggested for: EMS Chiefs, Medical Directors, Quality Improvement Managers

Group assessment

Bring your team together to discuss to discuss each of the 30 questions. This exercise allows the group to deliberate over each question and include multiple points of view before reaching a consensus.

Personnel to include: EMS Chief, Medical Director, Quality Improvement Manager, Cardiac Arrest Registry Coordinator, EMS Training Officer, Dispatch Director(s) for Primary and Secondary PSAPs, official responsible for Law Enforcement CPR and AED training/response, person responsible for community CPR training, person responsible for applications such as PulsePoint.

Comparative assessment

Assign the assessment to battalions to complete individually, then compare the results to gauge consistency of each team’s knowledge and approach system-wide. Interested in benchmarking?

Preparing for the Cardiac Arrest System Assessment

Depending on how you choose to take the assessment, it will require anywhere from 15-30 minutes to complete.

You can speed the process and increase the value of your results report by having the following information readily available:

  • Population for your response area.
  • Population density for your area.
  • Average response time for the first arriving unit staffed with EMS personnel. This is the interval of time from alert to arrival on scene.
  • Annual number of cardiac arrests (defined as having received CPR by EMS personnel).
  • Annual number of cardiac arrests survived to discharge from all rhythms.
  • Annual number of VF cases, including all cases where the patient presents in a shockable rhythm.
  • Annual number of witnessed VF cases discharged alive (if unknown, use all cases of VF).
  • Annual Number of cardiac arrests that receive bystander CPR.
  • Annual Percentage of cardiac arrests receiving public AED prior to arrival of EMS or police.

If some of this information is inaccessible or unknown, the assessment tool provides the option to use national average data. Note that you can update any fields with your system’s data at any time.

Have Everything Ready?